Fortnightly links: evidence-based policy, cholera, aid worker security, and more

Oxfam staff withdrawn from Malakal violence, South Sudan, 2014 (Grace Cahill/Oxfam/Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
Oxfam staff withdrawn from Malakal violence, South Sudan, 2014 (Grace Cahill/Oxfam/Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Some interesting research on the Washington Post Monkey Cage blog examines the barriers to evidence-based policy in developing countries.

A fascinating article on Devex highlights historical trends in public opinion about aid in the United States.

Annmaree O’Keeffe offers some insightful remarks on the “totally preventable catastrophe” that is the cholera epidemic in Yemen.

The latest edition of the Aid Worker Security Report, which compiles statistics on major incidents of violence against aid workers, finds the number of attacks in 2016 remained steady as compared to 2015. Chapter 2, which presents excerpts from interviews with representatives of Al Shabaab, the Taliban, and Haqqani Network about how they view aid organisations, is particularly interesting.

A new article published in PLoS ONE presents an updated cost-effectiveness analysis of 93 health interventions in low- and middle-income countries.

Camilla Burkot

Camilla Burkot is a Research Officer at the Development Policy Centre, where she works primarily on our program of research on Australian aid effectiveness and edits the Devpolicy Blog. She has a background in social anthropology and holds a Master of Public Health from Columbia University, and has field experience in Eastern and Southern Africa, and PNG.

Terence Wood

Terence Wood is a Research Fellow at the Development Policy Centre. He heads our program of research into Australian and New Zealand aid. Terence’s research interests include aid policy, the politics of aid, and governance in developing countries. He has recently finished his PhD, studying voter behaviour in the Solomon Islands elections. Prior to commencing PhD study Terence worked for the New Zealand government aid program.

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