All Comments

  • From Richard on Obituary for Simon Tosali

    Thanks Paul for a very fitting and well summised tribute to a humble and wise man. He managed well the pressing political expectations and expenditure appetites during his tenure and it was an absolute priveleged to have worked with him and you at the Treasury

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  • From Steve Pollard on Fiji civil society solidarity driving the COVID-19 humanitarian response

    This is an excellent initiative. Are there more examples, other CSO and NGO communities in the Pacific Islands that are coordinating their responses to COVID? Could they? Could governments with the support of current donor COVID relief programs help, because formal welfare programs and responses to COVID do not reach the greater communities that the CSOs and NGOs can reach?

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  • From Teresa Maria dos Santos da Cruz on Identity and opportunity for Timorese migrant workers in the UK

    Thanks Dr. Ann for this amazing report regarding Timorese migrant workers working overseas, especially in the UK. I finally found this site as I am going to report on the same topic as well. Nevertheless, I am super excited because that Timorese man is my uncle. This is such an extremely important report for us as the young generation to do research based on Timorese migrant workers overseas. Keep up the good job Dr. Ann. God Bless you🙏.

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  • From Roy Trivedy on Australia’s new COVID-19 development response strategy: strengths and contradictions

    Thanks Stephen. Very interesting. Does this now mean that Australia intends to reduce its use of sub-contracted service providers like PHD and instead make greater use of national systems? Is there any mention of how the multilateral system will be used in future?

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  • From JK Domyal on Australia’s new COVID-19 development response strategy: strengths and contradictions

    Thanks Stephen for a nice account of what it was and what it would be for post COVID-19 recovery in the Pacific.

    Australia’s COVID-19 response strategy is looking into the Pacific from the outside and based on Canberra’s recent experience on the pre- and post-COVID-19 pandemic.

    From the inside looking out, Pacific nations would experience pre- and post-COVID-19 from a much different angle, which may not hold the same view that of Canberra.

    One matter of fact is this: many assumed that once COVID-19 hit the shores of the Pacific, it would wipe out the entire population. This assumption has proven to hold no water. If Pacific nations could contain COVID-19 and even HIV/AIDS, what more better would Canberra expects.

    Therefore, Canberra’s COVID-19 response strategy may not include essential details of recovery that should otherwise be included if it looks from the inside.

    It needs more work along with the Pacific Step-up policy, COVID-19 is a good opportunity.

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  • From Benno BĂĽeler on Why charter cities have failed

    In the end, its all about numbers: (i) how many people in poor countries seek for a better life, (ii) how many years can they wait for the situation to improve, (iii) what reasonable immigration capacity could the rich countries offer? I do not claim that the following numbers are hard facts, but probably they show the order of magnitude: As for (i), I would assume 1-2 billion people today, with another 1-2 billion coming from population growth mainly in Africa over the next 40 years. As for (ii), not many… and as for (iii), don’t forget that North America, Australia/NZ and Western Europe host only in the range of 0.8 billion people. If we assume that they want to preserve the social structures, they may not accept more than 20% – 40% immigration from poor countries within 10 years. This would already stretch the political acceptance quite strongly I would assume. So the maximum short term immigration capacity may be in the range of 10% or less only. This is the reason why we definitly need other approaches to the justified need of the many poor poeple. Waiting for immigration into rich countries is just an illussion and can not meet the need.

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    • From Matt Woolf on Why charter cities have failed

      I don’t see waiting for immigration as an illusion, but perhaps it can’t be the only solution. Your point is well-taken. That said, I think the version of charter cities that requires a “guarantor” is just unlikely to work. Perhaps more special economic zones, etc?

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  • From joshua wienholt on Australia’s new COVID-19 development response strategy: strengths and contradictions

    This is truly an informative post Stephen especially that Pacific countries should not be opening in a hurry since there are still a number of countries with a lot of cases. The sooner the vaccine is made the faster the economies will recover.

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  • From Hirdesh on A plan for Fiji to open its borders

    Yes, I agree with you

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  • From Michael on Social distancing struggles as PNG schools resume

    Great job Joseph. A related article by NRI few weeks back suggested that some schools in PNG may not complete the units, and have to repeat next year if they have to follow physical distancing like how you describe here.

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    • From Joseph Pundu on Social distancing struggles as PNG schools resume

      Thank you Michael, yes I think many schools in PNG will find very hard to complete the units because of the time has been lost due to COVID-19.

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  • From Dr Amanda H A Watson on Social distancing struggles as PNG schools resume

    Thanks for this interesting piece Mr Pundu. It is valuable to have a sense of what is happening in schools in Port Moresby and other parts of the country.

    Thank you again,

    Dr Amanda H A Watson

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    • From Joseph Pundu on Social distancing struggles as PNG schools resume

      Your welcome Dr Amenda Watson.

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