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There are pros and cons of this line of thinking re Western colonialism and the date of political independence, which I cannot comment on. With regards to the influence of wantok system on our modern administrative and political systems, around 80% of my respondents think that wantok system has permeated formal structures of governance, therefore exacerbating corrupt practices. It's traditional novelty as an informal system of reciprocity has faded in significance.
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Did anyone put much 'R' into RAMSI might be the better question. RAMSI might have been authorized under the Pacific islands' Forum's Biketawa Declaration, but the lines of command and control were all back to Canberra, as we argued in S. 15 of our 2014 report - https://www.parliament.gov.sb/files/whatsnew/RAMSIDoc.pdf. Unfortunately there seems to be even less 'R' in the latest intervention
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Early Independence has ruined PNG. PNG lacked Western influence before Independence. We have a strong and dynamic instinct of culture - Wantok System. Therefore corruption in PNG is stemmed from this culture and eventually migrated into every work place and manifested our conscience. I believe in western style of thinking to manage our affairs. We should have allow more western influence. I think that could have shape PNG today.
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I disagree with the intention of this report. Can ANU engage local researchers rather to provide accurate information and research into such topics. We are not stricken by Poverty and Malnutrition in this country. I hate to read such bias research giving generalized views. You come to the Highlands of PNG and show me who is dying of Poverty and Malnution. Otherwise I oppose the research top and generalisation here.
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One of the preservation methods practiced by the people of Manus is drying sago starch in the sun. Once dried, it can be stored away for a long time. Hopefully this process also reduces mycotoxin fungus growth.
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It's refreshing to see this type of research that gets inside the heads of Pacific journalists to understand their approaches/attitudes to their work as the fourth estate. As a journalist until recently, I identify with many of the findings. I agree with the article that there is not enough research on Pacific journalists. We rely a lot on our journalists, but hardly take the time out to understand them and the challenges that they face.
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Everyday corruption is indeed not unique to PNG. However, the only difference would be the context in which these practices occur. For insurance, gift-giving in Nigeria using its own informal systems for reciprocity (ISRs) may not have the same degree of influence or form, as that of wantok system in PNG (Melanesia). There is a lot that we do not know about ourselves (or even if we know, we tend to ignore) when it comes to our traditions and moral obligations to the state. Western interventions can go as far as the system allows. Beyond that, we must deal with the context - development dynamics and challenges in cross-cultural settings sometimes can be difficult to reign in successfully. We have laws, but these laws are weak because they are not respected. One way to cut out corruption at the retail level (demand & supply of corruption) is to digitize all government transactions. Feel free to tease out ideas.
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I have been following the story line here in Port Moresby. Your brief commentaries in the intricoes of politics, politicians and foreign influence in politics in PNG rings familiar tone and views held by so many displaced and marginalized populations in both urban settlements and in rural villages. Our time bomb will one day sooner to explode. Joseph Sukwianomb, tiikiiembshiiemb.blogger.com
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Hello there Mr.Winn, I have much to talk about on this very important issue. Therefore, I think I need to have some direct discussion with you first and foremost from where we can chart out a leeway as to how best an effective strategy to curtail such a monster of a pandemic can ever be contemplated seeing that corruption has already grown its roots right throughout the entire nation: from every organ of state employing (politicians & public servants) and civil society including the private sector organisations. Please give me your phone number through email. Regards Richard Sasuara Port Moresby Papua New Guinea
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